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"Pace is all. Rhythm is master. Consistency is your friend."

Friday, December 22, 2006

Day Twenty Two: My Mind is Numb

I truly have very little to say tonight. Nothing exciting happened. Nothing cute to mention. Just an ordinary day.

Although I did talk to my dad today and I haven't talked to him in, oh, probably close to a year? That's probably about right. The last time I talked to him was probably Christmas 2005. But he called me the other night on my birthday and left a message. I finally got a chance to call him back today. It was nice hearing his voice. It wasn't as awkward as it usually is with lots of prolonged silences as we try and think of what small talk we can discuss. No, this was a nice visit. I think because it wasn't very long and since it had been so long since we talked I had a few things to report and we talked about my sister's upcoming wedding and then he had to go to work - so short and sweet. Probably for the best. He wished me a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year, although he said he hoped we talked before then, but he said it "just in case." That probably means I won't talk to him . . . but today was nice and I'm grateful to have heard his voice if nothing else.

Other than that I've got nothing, so I thought I would share an email that my mom forwarded to me the other day. Kind of a cheesy one, but I liked it. And as the stores fill with grinches and grumps doing their last minute shopping (none of whom do I have to run into since I'm finished thank goodness) and complain and gripe at retail staff all over the country - this should give us all something pleasant to think about; something to shift our focus just a bit.

The following is the philosophy of Charles Schultz, the creator of the "Peanuts" comic strip. You don't have to actually answer the questions. Just read the questions straight through, and you'll get the point.

1. Name the five wealthiest people in the world.
2. Name the last five Heisman trophy winners.
3. Name the last five winners of the Miss America.
4. Name ten people who have won the Nobel or Pulitzer Prize.
5. Name the last half dozen Academy Award winners for best actor and actress.
6. Name the last decade's worth of World Series winners.

How did you do? The point is, none of us remember the headliners of yesterday. These are no second-rate achievers. They are the best in their fields. But the applause dies. Awards tarnish. Achievements are forgotten. Accolades and certificates are buried with their owners .

Here's another quiz. See how you do on this one:

1. List a few teachers who aided your journey through school.
2. Name three friends who have helped you through a difficult time.
3. Name five people who have taught you something worthwhile.
4. Think of a few people who have made you feel appreciated and special.
5. Think of five people you enjoy spending time with.

Easier?

The lesson: The people who make a difference in your life are not the ones with the most credentials, the most money, or the most awards. They are the ones that care .



And the ones who love you even when you're in a grumpy mood for no good reason. And the ones who forgive you for snapping at them even when it's not really them you're angry with. And the ones who love you, every little bit of you - especially the parts you don't love about yourself - and give you a hug at the end of every day, just because.

Look around and be grateful for the people like that in your own life. And let them know how grateful you truly are.

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2 Comments:

At 12/23/2006 11:30:00 AM, Blogger TerraPraeta said...

Schultz knew what he was talking about. I was thinking a lot about friends and relationships this summer... and realized the people that are most important to me and that really matter are those that love me, not in spite of my faults, but because of them :-)

Merry Christmas, Nancy!

tp

 
At 12/24/2006 06:11:00 AM, Blogger MuseinMeltdown said...

Brilliant point - I shall link to it on my blog, well spotted.

Hugs Shani

ps - I also know how difficult it is to sustain conversation with relatives who should be close and aren't. At least there is conversation - the rest can come in time.

 

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